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Dry water?

Water fountain discoveries in the cafeteria. Student testing the water to ensure it isn't dry.

Shawnnika Williams

Water fountain discoveries in the cafeteria. Student testing the water to ensure it isn't dry.

Shawnnika Williams, Staff Writer

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Is water wet?

Students without their headphones in their ears may have heard this question floating throughout Richards for quite sometime, and many students are actually debating whether or not water is really wet. According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the definition of wet is “a consistency of containing, covered with, or soaked with liquid.” This seems very obvious, of course. However, many contend that  water is technically what makes a thing wet, but is not necessarily defined as “wet” itself.

“Water can’t be wet because it’s a chemical compound made up of one atom of oxygen and two atoms of hydrogen in a liquid state. You can not describe water as wet because “wet” is a feeling of which a liquid becomes into contact with another object,” says Richards student and aspiring scientist Raymond Height.

Many students believe this approach to be too complicated and instead defer to their common sense. If something is wet, it is simply wet. It’s the science behind it on what makes actual water wet.

“Yes, water is wet because whatever it surfaces on the object becomes wet as well. Water is a liquid. How can something that produces wetness not be wet? Water obviously can’t be dry,” says Chicago History teacher Mrs. Rahaf Othman. Using this logic, surely something that can’t be dry must always be wet, right? Maybe not.

A poll was taken of 111 voters from students and staff members. The results found that 59% of students and staff answered “yes” to water being wet while 41% answered “no.”

This philosophical question may never be answered. There are many different views of why or why not water is wet, and the anatomy behind it does not seem as deep as people are setting it out to be. What do you think?

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Dry water?