The student news site of Harold L. Richards High School

The Richards Herald

  • September 8Final Exams will be 8 a.m. to 1:10 p.m. on May 23 to May 25 at Richards High School

  • September 8Senior Final Exams will be 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. May 16 to May 18 at Richards High School

  • September 8Graduation May 25 at Richards High School

Don’t judge this book by its cover!

Cover+of+The+Adventures+of+Huckleberry+Finn+by+Mark+Twain
Cover of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Cover of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Cover of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Jenni Marie Schaal, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a very controversial book with an extreme and deep meaning underneath what meets the eye.

Huckleberry Finn, a young teenager in Missouri around 1830s-40s, writes this novel as a letter to the reader. It becomes clear that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer but the novel is fully graspable without reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer first.

The first few chapters are fairly slow moving, but they do reveal important details. Twain himself, hated the idea of ‘Religious Hypocrisy’. Which is why he painted Huck Finn’s caretakers the Widow and Ms. Watson in that light. It is also important to note Twain was very much against slavery and thought it was immoral, playing a role in why he gave the two women very religious personalities but also owned slaves. Also, Huck Finn’s money plays an important role in the plot, foreshadowing future events. It is also important to note Twain was a man who despised the Romanticism movement, which was the movement of literature writing moving away from structure and becoming more exaggerated. Twain was making point of that with Tom Sawyers exaggerated nature when he creates a gang with Huck Finn.

Huck Finns first encounter with bad luck and superstition happens when he spills salt at the dining table. First off, Huck Finn is very uneducated and just now becoming “civilized” in the eyes of his caretakers who firmly believe the more civilized is better. Twain also hated the idea of superstition. Twain believed superstition was the way the uneducated explained daily occurrences. Which does tie into Huck Finn and Jim, Ms. Watson’s slave, not being educated but believed in superstition.

Mark Twain hated the idea of abusive parents. Twain thought they were one of the lowest people. Huck’s money also came into play from the beginning of the novel and fueled Paps to continue on after him. Paps kidnapping Huck Finn is important because it’s a change in tone and where the novel begins picking up the pace. Although Huck Finn begins to enjoy the ‘uncivilized’ life, he wants to escape from Paps grasp. A now turning point in the novel, Huck Finn had faked his own death so his father and the widow would not search for him. Then he left downstream to Jackson island.

Huck Finn eventually runs into Jim, who is revealed as a runaway. This event is important because like before, Twain hated religious hypocrisy and slavery, and Ms. Watson trying to sell Jim reflects both. While Jim and Huck Finn run off an establish a new life in a cave, they find a body, which is very important revolving around the end of the novel. Twain’s thoughts on superstition comes into play again when Jim tells Huck talking about the dead body will bring bad luck. But then, Jim also says snake skin is very bad luck. And, to them, it did come. Jim was bit by a snake during a harmless prank by Huck Finn. But both are convinced by superstition instead. While trying to cure Jim, they act on superstitious beliefs such as tying the rattle around Jims wrist in order to counter the effects.

After Jim and Huck Finn have been running for a while, they come across a steamboat on a stormy night. There isn’t much importance of this other then it is a setting for a chapter or two. But it does prompt Huck Finn to tell stories of Kings, Queens, and Dukes in England. It is foreshadowing for future events. Jim replied he only knew of King Solomon, from the Biblical story. It is small but it reflects the idea that society thought religion was only for the educated, which Jim and Huck Finn both were not.

Jim and Huck Finn eventually get separated and Huck Finn loses the raft. They do find each other. But Jim believes this is bad luck foreshadowed. It is another play on superstition. At this point, Huck Finn and Jim are met by two men hunting for runaway slaves. Jim is hiding away in the raft, and Huck Finn lies to protect Jim. Eventually, the two men part their way, and Huck Finn and Jim lose the raft. It is once again another play on superstition.

Eventually, just like the raft, Huck gets separated from Jim. Huck Finn continues on and comes across the Grangerfords, a family living a feud with the Shepardsons. It’s one of Twains ultimate play on society. During the time period, a real feud between two families was happening. Both families were famous for it, but Twain saw it as a stupid stunt. Eventually, Huck parts his way with them when the feud causes the young boy Huck’s age to die. He runs off and is reunited with Jim once again, who found the raft.

Huck Finn and Jim continued the adventure on the raft, and came across two men who claimed they were Dukes and Kings. They weren’t a King or a Duke, but scam artists who were using Huck and Jim. Huck and Jim eventually caught on, but didn’t say anything. The Duke and King made Huck and Jim participate in their scams.

Twain points out the mob mentality when he has a town try to lynch a man with no proof. Then when the man says don’t lynch me, they don’t.

Then, the King and Duke cause Huck and Jim to be involved in one scam that’s dangerous. Once the town finds out and tries to lynch them, Huck Finn escaped. After wondering around the King finds him and threatens him. Huck and Jim are forced to continue on with the King and Duke, until one day the Duke gave Jim away for profit.

Once Huck Finn figured where he was sold to, he went there as fast as he could. Huck Finn then wrote a letter, but he couldn’t send it. He wanted to let Miss Watson know where Jim is to clean himself from sin, but he couldn’t go through with it and claimed he rather go to Hell. Twain included this because Huck was taught it was wrong to allow free slaves and he would go to Hell. It’s another form of Religious Hypocrisy.

Huck Finn makes it to the farm where Jim is held, and pretends to be the nephew, who also was his friend, Tom Sawyer. He does a well job at it too, and eventually Tom Sawyer shows up. Well, Tom Sawyer pretends to be another passing traveler so he can help Huck Finn. He decides to help Huck Finn steal Jim back from the farm.

Overall, I recommend this book to read because of Twain’s hidden messages. In my opinion, it was a good book.

 

 

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Opinion

    Live Like Abby

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    Dress codes: Are they one sided?

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    Older women are having healthier babies

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    Strength/Cardio is an amazing class that has changed me greatly

  • Opinion

    The importance of Planned Parenthood

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    I disagree with Black History Month

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    The Dakota Access Pipeline should be stopped

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    The best haunted houses to go to this fall

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    The Glory of October 31st

  • Don’t judge this book by its cover!

    Opinion

    Scary Movies to watch

The student news site of Harold L. Richards High School
Don’t judge this book by its cover!